• acafanmom:

    heidi8:

    Vote for our panel! And a few others, too!

    fyeahcopyright:

    Every year, South BY Southwest (SXSW) brings tech companies, content providers, nonprofits and thousands of others to Austin, TX to talk about tech, content, privacy, interaction and so much more. 

    This year, FYC’s heidi8, along with flourish and wordplaying, have submitted a panel proposal on How Not to Irk Your Fandom. If it’s selected, they’ll be talking about interactions between fandoms and The Powers That Be - or Those Who Want To Control Fandom - where things have gone terribly wrong and where things have been reasonably right. They’ll also share some Best Practices for how to keep glitches to a minimum and develop positive fan/creator interactions. As a sociologist, a transmedia producer and an attorney, they bring three diverse perspectives to the discussion. 

    You can also vote for flourish - along with Henry Jenkins and theorlandojones - who have a film panel proposal at http://panelpicker.sxsw.com/vote/42402 - you do have to register to vote, but it’s easy and they don’t spam. 

    (And if you can reblog/share the link, we would really appreciate it!)

    Other friends that have panels up for consideration: 

    1. Andrew Slack of thehpalliance has an SXSWEDU panel on Super Heroes for Social Justice

    2. bookshop, Alexandra Edwards, Yashoda Sampath and Amber Gordan have a proposal on fan/creator interactions from the fan and platform perspectives. 

    3. jaybushman is part of a proposal on funding webserieses. 

    4. Megan Westerby, Cory Lubovitch of the-real-team-starkid, Sarah Weichel and Rae Votta hope to present on the state of YouTube.

    Do a search on just the word “fan” to know why the panels on fan/producer relations are so, so important. Every other panel is on how to monetize fandom, seriously.

    She’s not joking. As I said on Monday, if you search for the actual word “fandom” SXSW returns only 13 results, among which are some of the panels on this list. But if you look at the “fan engagement" tag, you get nine hundred results about how to tap into fandom culture in order to get a) money or b) free content from fans.

    It’s a HEAVILY exploitative environment peopled mostly by the very social media and marketing people who will take away the wrong lessons about what fandom has to offer them unless they’re presented with fans representing themselves, and this is why it’s really important to stop and take a moment to vote for the people on this list.

    Our panel is called “The No-Bullshit Guide to Interacting With Fandom,” and it’s very, very similar to Heidi and Flourish’s, in that it also addresses the pitfalls of marketing to and interacting with fandom, and yes, best practices for how not to make an ass of yourself. Our panel features an Emmy winning Jane Austen fan, a brilliant social media marketer, and the person who made all of Tumblr want to go to Dennys. 

    Please vote for all of us!

    (via acafanmomarchive)

  • Anonymous
    Do you have any feelings on the latest WTNV controversy? (That the co-author of 'Summer Reading Program' episode has been revealed to write underage rape fanfiction, and as the creator of Tamika's character, people are skeeved out and upset by this.)

    I’ve read the accusatory post in question as well as the rebuttals from people who say that the AO3 tags don’t actually do justice to the fic, that the fics were actually victim-focused and not actually erotic.

    Personally, I think it’s absolutely despicable to police someone’s ID this way when all you have for a justification is literally “won’t someone think of the children!”, and I think that it’s especially despicable in fandom where we might have 10000 reasons for writing specific tropes or kinks that people outside of fandom might view as harmful. You don’t know if she’s a victim. You don’t know how she’s treating the topic. You don’t know if she wrote those fics when she was 12 years old herself and trying to explore sexuality in ways that were comfortable and safe for her. You just don’t fucking know, and more importantly unless she signed up with the AO3 name “[Real Name Redacted]” or linked to her AO3 account from LinkedIn, you weren’t supposed to know. It seems like someone deliberately tied her real life professional identity to her fanfic identity, which is bullshit, absolute BULLSHIT. you do NOT out fanfic writers. What the fuck. That’s what got me fired from my job 11 years ago, that is the #1 first fucking rule of fandom, that is why we would rather pull an article than endanger people in the fandom who feel less safe because of it. You do not out fans. You do not out fans.

    It’s possible that someone might one day go through my Prince of Tennis fics and try to blacklist my work because I’ve written numerous fics about various characters, aged up significantly, who started out as 11 and 12 years old in their respective canons. Or criticize me because I wrote fics where two teens had sex at age 15, or decide that I’m unfit to do my job or represent fandom in public because I wrote a fic where a gay serial killer and a sociopath practices dubious consent with bloodplay and then gets a happy ending, or because probably somewhere in my recs I’ve bookmarked fics that feature non-con or abusive relationships or incest or who the fuck knows. If someone wanted to go on a witch hunt, they’d have plenty of material. 

    And the same thing applies to every single person reading this. If someone wanted to connect your fanfic handle to your real life and then take a stroll through your kinks and tags looking for dirty little secrets, then use it to create controversy and try to ruin your professional career, are you sure they wouldn’t be able to? I wouldn’t take that bet. And I’m way more horrified by the fact that someone thought this was an acceptable way of creating dialogue than by the content of her fics.

    I think there absolutely is a time and a place and a context for discussing whether someone’s fictional work should factor into their professional reputation, but the way to have that discussion is not to fucking stalk them on AO3 and then screencap the content of their fics in order to out them on Tumblr. Absolutely disgusting, and the quickest fucking way to ruin fandom as a safe space.

  • elizabethminkel:

    bookshop:

    FUCK YES I HOPE THIS HAPPENS EVERY TIME SOME SHITTY INTERVIEW LIKE THIS ONE POPS UP

    SHE EVEN LINKED DIRECTLY TO THE #CELEBRITIES ANCHOR TAG

    MY HERO

    This is beautiful. We should make a widget to automate this process, one that tweets literally those words: “No. Stop.” and then the link.

    omg quick someone make didsomeonesaysomethingstupidaboutfanfic.com 

    you could choose from a drop-down menu like

    • someone said fanfic writers are plagiarists
    • someone broke the fourth wall (badly)
    • someone thinks fanfic is like selling your children into white slavery
    • someone is trying to exploit fanwork with dumb marketing ploys
    • someone thinks bronies are special
    • someone said fanfic is illegal
    • someone said all fanfic is porn
    • someone said slash is just fetishizing gay dudes
    • someone thinks you’re going to hell
    • something something “twilight fangirls”
    • something something “tween one direction stans”

    with quotes and a link back to the article for everythingggg i can see it now

  • FUCK YES I HOPE THIS HAPPENS EVERY TIME SOME SHITTY INTERVIEW LIKE THIS ONE POPS UP

    SHE EVEN LINKED DIRECTLY TO THE #CELEBRITIES ANCHOR TAG

    MY HERO

  • Guys my editor asked me to illustrate a piece that hellotailor and I cowrote that’s going up next week

    So I made a thing to illustrate the fourth wall

    image

    Did it work

  • Supernatural’s Fall from Grace (via bookshop)

    This is a really good articleExcept that I am so sick of being treated like Destiel shippers are an aberrationLike we’re just this weird cluster of fans that are actively being mocked and we should just sit under our bridge like trollsI am really not happy about that tone in the articleBut all of the legit criticisms of the show I completely agree withSPN,supernaturalnegativity for ts.

    Obviously the author is dead and I can’t take back any of my words once they’re out there and open to reader interpretation, but FWIW, I emphatically absolutely did not intend to treat Destiel or Wincest shippers as though they were an aberration, and I am basically the absolute last fan to ever advocate for fans to sit under their bridge like trolls. I think that there’s a lot of deference that needs to be shown to fans who want to remain under that bridge—and by under the bridge I mean the fourth wall. SPN is a loud and vocal fandom, and that’s amazing, but not everyone wants to be loud and vocal, and that’s fine, too. The distance between fandom and TPTB creates tension in SPN fandom, but I didn’t intend to advocate for or against that separateness—just to observe that it exists.

    The mockery the show indulges in is not a mockery that is or ever has been warranted, and I tried to make that clear in my article. The quote from the article that I chose to post here points out that the popularity of these ships arise from the canon’s denial of the diverse identities and emotional richness of its fans. And my friend Catherine Tosenbeger goes a step further and argues that the shipping arises in part from the need of fans to break the cycle of misery/death/loss/miscommunication and see Sam and Dean get a happy ending for once. 

    So, no, absolutely at no point at all did I intend to paint SPN fans or Destiel shippers as a “weird cluster of fans.” If I did then my own Tumblr would look pretty hypocritical right now.

    (via robinsgirlwonder)

  • "Sam, Dean, and Cas are lost and parentless, with no idea how to express intimacy, because intimacy in SPN is feminine, and all the women they know are dead. SPN’s final Big Bad has always been the threat that real male intimacy poses to its proto-masculine image of itself. It’s a fight of continual repression and internalized shame, waged in sideswipes, gay jokes, and incessant shaming of effeminacy, nerdiness, and anything that might resemble nuanced expressions of male gender. Narratively, out of nine seasons, SPN has only had five canonically gay characters with a 50% survival rate. And “dorky guys” including Castiel are consistently made fodder for Dean’s and the show’s amusement, not admiration or attraction.

    But the more SPN mocks and represses, the more it has to contend with its own fandom—female, queer, genderqueer, nerdy, and unashamed. The fandom’s culling of queer and genderqueer readings from SPN deliberately repudiates its textual scouring of their own identities and emotional landscapes. SPN’s fandom is diametrically opposed to the straightlaced mainstream audience SPN wishes it had. So SPN’s creative team routinely breaks the fourth wall in the most passive-aggressive way: to remind fans that they see you and they disapprove."
  • Is Roberto Orci too out of touch with the Star Trek fandom to direct the new film?

    In the original series, the worst punishment the crew of the Enterprise could devise for their enemies, the Klingons, was inflicting them with a ship full of tribbles. In the new franchise, the Federation government is so corrupt and evil that it’s willing to sabotage its own ships in order to fabricate a reason for war against the Klingons. This is not your parents’ Star Trek.

    [READ MORE]

    (via dailydot)

  • "Orci’s response to Dickerson’s editorial revealed how far removed he is from the fandom that has given Star Trek such a legion of followers over time. Calling Dickerson the equivalent of “a child acting out against his parents,” he went on to imply superior knowledge of how to craft the film.

    Engaging with fans this way is never a good idea, but Star Trek fans in particular have been their franchise’s lifeline at numerous points over the years. Comparing a man who’s written two scripts to a die-hard fan of a 50-year-old show doesn’t exactly yield a parent-child relationship—or if it does, it’s not structured the way Orci seems to think it is.

    Fans might also question whether a man who’s writing for one of the most temporally progressive science-fiction franchises in this or any galaxy is qualified to do so when he purports not to understand feminism, one of humanity’s most progressive political philosophies and one that affects over half the planet. After all, if Orci can demand that audiences swallow two hours of character assassination upon Khan Noonien Singh, the least he can do in return is a cursory Google search for "third-wave feminism.""
  • May 10 – 431 Notes
    #star trek
    #fandom
    #the fourth wall
    #sexism
    #feminism
    #tos
    response to Dickerson’s editorial revealed how far removed he is from the fandom that has given Star Trek such a legion of followers over time. Calling Dickerson the equivalent of “a child acting out against his parents,” he went on to imply superior knowledge of how to craft the film.

    Engaging with fans this way is never a good idea, but Star Trek fans in particular have been their franchise’s lifeline at numerous points over the years. Comparing a man who’s written two scripts to a die-hard fan of a 50-year-old show doesn’t exactly yield a parent-child relationship—or if it does, it’s not structured the way Orci seems to think it is.

    Fans might also question whether a man who’s writing for one of the most temporally progressive science-fiction franchises in this or any galaxy is qualified to do so when he purports not to understand feminism, one of humanity’s most progressive political philosophies and one that affects over half the planet. After all, if Orci can demand that audiences swallow two hours of character assassination upon Khan Noonien Singh, the least he can do in return is a cursory Google search for "third-wave feminism."-http://tmblr.co/ZzuRay1FVGcCL" target="_blank">